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Plagiarism: FAQs

What is plagiarism?

  • Plagiarism is deliberately or unintentionally presenting another person's words or ideas as if they were your own.
  • Please read the College's policy on plagiarism and cheating.
  • "There are other acts of academic dishonesty that closely resemble plagiarism. Submitting the same paper in two courses means you are passing off work done in one course as work done in another course. Usually, dual submissions require the permission of both instructors" (Storey 51).

How common is plagiarism?

  • In a 2002-2003 survey of Canadian undergraduate students, 37% reported plagiarizing at least once during the past year (Christensen Hughes and McCabe).
  • In a 2011 survey of Canadian undergraduate students, 30% reported plagiarizing at least once since starting university (Jurdi et al.).

How do you avoid plagiarizing?

  • Use quotation marks or block indents to indicate when you quote another person's words
  • Your paraphrases should not closely resemble the sentences you are paraphrasing
  • Cite the source you are quoting or paraphrasing
  • For further information please see these books or ask a librarian

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Works cited

Christensen Hughes, Julia M., and Donald L. McCabe. "Academic Misconduct within Higher Education in Canada." Canadian Journal of Higher Education, vol. 36, no. 2, 2006, pp. 1-21, journals.sfu.ca/cjhe/index.php/cjhe/article/view/183537

Jurdi, Rozzet, et al. "Academic Dishonesty in the Canadian Classroom: Behaviours of a Sample of University Students." Canadian Journal of Higher Education, vol. 41, no. 3, 2011, pp. 1-35, journals.sfu.ca/cjhe/index.php/cjhe/article/view/1

Storey, William Kelleher. Writing History: A Guide for Students. 5th ed. Oxford UP, 2016.